Question: What Does Custard Mean In Cockney?

Why do Cockneys call a watch a kettle?

The term means watch, which has stemmed from a fob watch which was a pocket watch with attached to the body with a small chain.

The kettle used to boil on the hob of a stove… hence the rhyme.

This is a term used widely in London even to this days, usually to describe a girls features..

What is cockney rhyming slang for toilet?

Khazi is Cockney slang for Toilet.

Why do British call bathroom loo?

Loo. ‘Loo’ is our very own British word for the toilet, deriving from the French “guardez l’eau”, which means “watch out for the water”. … When the British adopted it they shortened it to the more pronounceable “gardy-loo”, which eventually became “loo” and was applied to the toilet itself.

Who uses Cockney rhyming slang today?

It is especially prevalent in the UK, Ireland and Australia. It was first used in the early 19th century in the East End of London; hence its alternative name, Cockney rhyming slang.

What’s a dry lunch in Cockney slang?

dry lunch (plural dry lunches) (England, slang) A contemptible or uncool person.

What is cockney rhyming slang for head?

Loaf of Bread is Cockney slang for Head.

What does custard mean cockney rhyming?

“Battle cruiser” rhymes with “boozer,” another word for a pub or bar. “No one’s watching the custard” means “no one’s watching the TV.” “Custard and jelly” rhymes with “telly.” “A fat geezer’s north opens” means “a fat guy opens his mouth.” “North and south” rhymes with “mouth.”

What is cockney slang for brother?

Manhole Cover is Cockney slang for Brother.

What does butcher’s mean in Cockney?

Bubble = Bubble & Squeak = Greek. Butcher’s = butcher’s hook = look.

What does Kermit mean in cockney rhyming slang?

RoadKermit is Cockney slang for Road.

What does Bunny mean in Cockney slang?

It’s actually from the Cockney rhyming slang “rabbit & pork “– talk – but your bunny has plenty to say, even if it can’t speak out loud.

Why is 500 called a monkey?

Derived from the 500 Rupee banknote, which featured a monkey. Explanation: While this London-centric slang is entirely British, it actually stems from 19th Century India. … Referring to £500, this term is derived from the Indian 500 Rupee note of that era, which featured a monkey on one side.